Need for Speed Hot Pursuit Remastered – Game

About Need for Speed Hot Pursuit Remastered – Game



Need for Speed Hot Pursuit Remastered System Requirements

Minimum

  • CPU: (AMD) Phenom II X4 965 or equivalent (Intel) Corei3-2120 or equivalent
  • RAM: 8 GB
  • OS: WIndows 10
  • VIDEO CARD: (AMD) Radeon HD5750 or equivalent (Nvidia) GeForce GTS 450 or equivalent
  • PIXEL SHADER: 5.0
  • VERTEX SHADER: 5.0
  • FREE DISK SPACE: 45 GB
  • DEDICATED VIDEO RAM: 512 MB

Need for Speed Hot Pursuit Remastered System Requirements

Recommended

  • CPU: (AMD) FX-8350 or equivalent (Intel) Core i5-3550K or equivalent
  • RAM: 8 GB
  • OS: Windows 10
  • VIDEO CARD: (AMD) Radeon R9 270x or equivalent (Nvidia) GeForce GTX 660 or Equivalent
  • PIXEL SHADER: 5.0
  • VERTEX SHADER: 5.0
  • FREE DISK SPACE: 45 GB
  • DEDICATED VIDEO RAM: 2048 MB








Need for Speed Hot Pursuit Remastered Game Details

Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit is a 2010 racing video game developed by Criterion Games and published by Electronic Arts for PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Wii, Microsoft Windows, iOS, Android, webOS, and Windows Phone. The Wii version was developed by Exient Entertainment. Hot Pursuit is the sixteenth Need for Speed title and was released in November 2010, with digital distribution versions released within December 2010. This version is a reboot of Need for Speed III: Hot Pursuit (1998). A remastered version, titled Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit Remastered, was released on November 6, 2020, for Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One, and on November 13, 2020, for Nintendo Switch.

Hot Pursuits gameplay is set in the fictional Seacrest County, which is based on the American states of California, Oregon and Washington, in which players can compete in several types of races. Players can compete online (except in the Wii version), which includes additional game modes such as Hot Pursuit, Interceptor and Race. The game features a new social interaction system called “Autolog”, which is a network that connects friends for head-to-head races and compares player stats for competition. The game also features paid downloadable content in the form of new cars, new race and pursuit events, and new trophies and achievements.

Hot Pursuit was well received by critics at E3 2010 and was most notably awarded with “Best Racing Game” from the 2010 Game Critics Awards as well as several other media outlets. It won several Best Racing Game awards, including Best Driving Game at the Spike 2010 Video Game Awards. The game also won a BAFTA Award for its Autolog multiplayer component.



GAMEPLAY

Microsoft Windows, PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360

Hot Pursuit goes back to the Need for Speed series’ roots and takes on the gameplay style of earlier Need for Speed III: Hot Pursuit and Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit 2 titles in the Need for Speed franchise with exotic cars and high-speed police chases. Hot Pursuit lets players be either a racer or a police driver, and features a full career mode for both roles. The relationship between the cops and racers is described as “a dog chasing down a rabbit”; the police being more powerful while the racers are faster. Each side has several power-ups including calling for roadblocks and radar jamming. According to Criterion the single-player section is somewhere between 12 and 15 hours long, but with much replay value.

The game takes place in a fictional location known as Seacrest County based on Southern California, Arizona, and Colorado. It’s an open world and features over 100 miles (160 km) of open road, four times larger than that of Burnout Paradise, Criterion’s previous title. Hot Pursuit features a new social interaction system called “Autolog” which is described as “Facebook for the game”. The game features both single-player and multiplayer game modes with up to eight players; as an option to live multiplayer racing, players can post records and achievements on the Autolog feed for friends to see, which they then can try to beat. Autolog also contains an experience system called “Bounty”. As of July 2012, the Web Dashboard for Autolog was shut down for all games, except Need for Speed: Most Wanted.

The driving mode of the game is described as “fun, accessible, okay”, however not as arcade-styled as Burnout Paradise, but far from a simulator. All vehicles in Hot Pursuit are licensed real-world cars and SUVs, described as “all the cars you dreamed of driving, in the way you dreamed of driving them”.

Most vehicles are available in both racer and police variants, but a few cars are exclusive to each side. Also exclusively featured in the Hot Pursuit is the Porsche 918 Spyder concept. Ferrari automobiles however, last seen in a Shift DLC-pack but notably absent from all other Need for Speed games since Hot Pursuit 2, are also absent from Hot Pursuit. There is no car customization or tuning, other than color changing, “just because the game really focuses on the Hot Pursuit element.” Unlike previous Need for Speed games which use unbranded, fictional models, real cars like the Audi A4, Chevrolet Cobalt, Porsche Cayenne, Nissan Frontier, and Ram 1500 are used as traffic cars.

Wii

The Wii version of Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit has very little in common with its Xbox 360, PlayStation 3 and Windows counterparts. This version was designed by a different company (Exient Entertainment), and was a completely different game in nearly every virtual aspect: graphics, soundtrack, racing modes, gameplay, and customization. Some reviewers cited that the Wii version showed stark similarities to a previous Need for Speed installment, Nitro. This version takes place in four real-life cities across the world, as opposed to the fictional Seacrest County in the other versions. The four cities, each set in a different time of day Chongqing, China, set in the morning, Dubai, United Arab Emirates, set in the afternoon, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, set in the early evening, and Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, which is set in the late evening.

In Career mode, there are 4 super-tournaments (each city) and a Grand Prix Tournament. Each super-tournament consists of four smaller tournaments, which consist of Hot Pursuit (circuit with cops), Eliminator (knockout), Time Marker (solo timed circuit) and Rush Hour (100 to 1) races. Each super tournament concludes with a Boss Race, which is a free roam race (with GPS) to capture more of the checkpoint flags than the Boss (2 out of 3, etc.). Besides Career, the game offers Quick Race mode, which allows up to four players on split screens, each with their own map, and the four race types from Career plus a fifth, “Interceptor” (be a cop & bust a speeder).

The cars, purchased with Bounty, improve in speed, acceleration, and strength (D, C, B, A, and S Class cars, plus police vehicles in the Quick Race’s “Interceptor” race). Racers do not have names, just the Career/Profile names. During the race, players can accumulate and use regular nitro and super nitro (more powerful but shorter), similar to Need for Speed: Nitro. Power-ups/”Supes” are acquired while driving: Boost (extra nitro), Drain (others’ nitro), Cruise Control (brief auto-steering), Deflect The Heat (send police after opponents), Jammer (invisibility to police), Tank (resistance to crash damage), Soundwave (circular explosion), and Repair (immediate car restoration). Repair is the most important, as players’ car must be in a good condition to accumulate Nitro and be immune from being busted by the cops.

A complex yet extensive range of visual customization options is available, including body kits, wheels, and a full range of colors & vinyls, including freehand drawing ability. The most obvious difference is that the graphics and racing physics in this version are completely different from the other versions, giving it a retro look and feel reminiscent of much older pre-GameCube or Mario Kart type games.


STORY

Need for Speed Hot Pursuit launches you into a new open-world landscape behind the wheel of the world’s fastest and most beautiful cars. From Criterion, the award-winning studio behind the Burnout series, Hot Pursuit will redefine racing games for a whole new generation.

You’ll experience stunning speeds, takedowns, and getaways as you battle your friends in the most connected Need for Speed game ever. Through Need for Speed Autolog and its innovative approach to connected social competition, your Hot Pursuit experience will extend beyond the console onto the web, constantly moving your gameplay in new and unique directions.

Loaded with action, this game will challenge you to become Seacrest County’s top cop or most wanted racer. For the first time ever in a Need for Speed game, you’ll be able to play a full career on either side of the law. Whether you’re a lead-foot speeder or a cop with a mean streak, make sure your aviators are spotless and your driving record is anything but.


Development

The game was first hinted at during E3 2009 by EA’s CEO, John Riccitiello. Riccitiello stated that Criterion Games, developers of EA’s own Burnout series, was working on a “revolutionary” addition to the Need for Speed franchise, stating: “We don’t have a plan right now for a separate major launch on Burnout, because the team doing it is working on a revolutionary take on Need for Speed.” The title was confirmed to be in development by EA’s chief operating officer, John Pleasants, at a Stock meeting in June 2009, where he stated: “We’ve taken the Burnout team and combined it with our Need for Speed franchise. So we now have that in our favor because that Burnout team is probably one of the more online-centric and notably high-quality game developers that we have out at Criterion.” Shift producer, Jesse Abney, expressed his delight to work with Criterion Games, stating that it would be a “great team to work with on that stuff,” referencing the development of Need for Speed. It was reported that the game was scheduled for release in Q4 2010. EA’s COO, John Schappert, said that the Q4 NFS title was, “a new action based Need for Speed from our Criterion Studio,” in a post-financial report conference call. The title was officially revealed as Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit at EA’s Media Briefing during E3 2010, with a trailer which showed a high-speed police chase involving three different racers. The trailer was followed by a live demo of the game on stage between creative director Craig Sullivan as a cop and producer Matt Webster as a racer. According to Riccitiello, the game was in development for two years.

In August 2010, before Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit was set to take center stage at EA’s press conference during Gamescom, it was announced by art director Henry LaBounta that Criterion collaborated with Battlefield creators EA Digital Illusions CE (DICE) in building the massive open world of Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit. Early in November 2010, Patrick Söderlund, Senior Vice President of EA Games Europe, said this of the collaboration: “I think the most important thing, when you have two high-quality developers working together, for it to work, they need to have mutual respect. They need to have that respect, to say ‘Ok, we trust you to do this.’ This was a case where that was so obvious, where the Criterion team had a full trust in the DICE team to do what they were doing, and vice versa.”

Recent games in the Need for Speed franchise included a story, but Matt Webster, producer of Hot Pursuit, said: “We didn’t really think it was necessary to include a story. If you’re a cop, the aim is to go up the ranks, while a racer’s aim is to get to the highest rank they can.” EA stated that the combination of acclaimed developer Criterion Games, a socially-focused online mode and official car licences makes the franchise more accessible than before. UK product manager for Need for Speed Kevin Flynn said: “This is definitely the best Need for Speed I’ve seen to date. I thought Shift was a great game but different and a bit serious, while Hot Pursuit is more fun and accessible.”

With the game sharing the same title as the 1998 installment in the franchise, the game’s creative director, Craig Sullivan, told why they didn’t name the game something totally different, stating: “To be honest when we started out making the game we didn’t know it was going to be called Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit, we just didn’t. We got to the game before we got to the name. We realized we were making something that had a lot of cops in it and was really interesting to us, so we thought what can we call this? Eventually we thought this actually fits quite well with Hot Pursuit and went with it.”


Release

In early July 2010 EA announced Need for Speed Hot Pursuit on Tour, a seven-city event that took the game around the United States prior to the game’s release. Each stop featured recording artists and showcased an assortment of exotic cars. The tour began on 14 July 2010 at the Manhattan Classic Car Club in New York City, headlined by DJ Z-Trip. It then continued to Chicago, Seattle, San Francisco, Austin and Miami, ending with the Hot Pursuit launch party in Los Angeles. EA received a helping hand from UK vehicle wrapping company Totally Dynamic for the UK launch event, held at Totally Dynamic’s South London centre. In addition to the standard edition, a Limited Edition of the game has been released, which was originally only available through pre-order at the same price as the regular game. However, it was still available beside the regular game, but in limited quantities. The Limited Edition features numerous bonuses over the standard edition, including exclusive packaging, two exclusive racers and four unlocked cars.

The Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit demo was available for download on 26 October on Xbox Live Marketplace worldwide and the PlayStation Network in North America and on 27 October 2010 on the PlayStation Network in Europe. The demo was a limited time demo and closed on 9 November 2010. Criterion Games stated that “Unlike Xbox 360 and PS3 versions, PC demos require comparatively more resources to ensure that they run smoothly across a wide variety of systems,” for not getting the chance to release a demo for the PC. The demo was a hit, the demo was download more than 2 million times, making the demo for Hot Pursuit the “most popular demo in Need for Speed history”.

EA announced on 15 November 2010 the first two Games with Developer, both on the first weekend after the game launched. The event allowed the players to test their newly developed skills against those who had a hand in creating the game. EA announced on 26 November 2010 an Autolog Recommends Contest. It was a two-week-long competition. If the fans beat any of NFSDrew’s Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit Autolog recommended times on Xbox or PS3, it gave one of them the chance to win a custom (NTSC) Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit PlayStation 3, which is an extremely rare Collector’s Edition. EA also announced two Autolog Photo Contests, the first ended 26 November 2010 and the second 6 January 2011. The players had to take creative photos, then EA with the community announced the best and creative photo, which win a custom Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit PlayStation 3 Limited Collector’s Edition. EA announced the Friday Gaming Sessions, which started on 17 January 2011. EA announced the Need for Speed Autolog iPhone app in late November 2010. The app features the Wall, Dreamshots, Autolog Recommendations, SpeedWall and a Play Later button. The app was released on iTunes on 13 December 2010.

Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit was well received by critics at E3 2010 and was most notably awarded with “Best Racing Game” from Game Critics Awards as well as several other media outlets. Other games in the category included Forza Motorsport 4, Gran Turismo 5, Test Drive Unlimited 2 and MotorStorm: Apocalypse. IGN stated that it had “an inspired level of connectivity”, while 1UP.com claimed that “the other racing games at E3 never had a chance”. This was the first game in the Need for Speed series since the original Hot Pursuit to win an E3 award. Hot Pursuit was also nominated for “Best Xbox 360” and “Best PS3” game by IGN, and “Best Graphics” by Gaming Excellence.




Need for Speed Hot Pursuit Remastered Download Files 

  • fg-01.bin (2.0 GB)
  • fg-02.bin (810.5 MB)
  • fg-03.bin (315.5 MB)
  • fg-04.bin (38.8 MB)
  • fg-05.bin (18.2 MB)
  • fg-06.bin (317.9 KB)
  • fg-selective-english.bin (90.8 MB)
  • fg-selective-french.bin (89.3 MB)
  • fg-selective-german.bin (100.3 MB)
  • fg-selective-italian.bin (107.2 MB)
  • fg-selective-japanese.bin (47.3 MB)
  • fg-selective-russian.bin (106.9 MB)
  • fg-selective-spanish.bin (102.3 MB)

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Need for Speed Hot Pursuit Remastered - Game Free Download đŸ“„ - Gamingwap

File Size 4 GB

Need for Speed Hot Pursuit Remastered - Game Free Download đŸ“„ - Gamingwap

File Size 21 GB

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